Tag Archives: recycle to land

Farming; Adding Safety as Value

 

 

Bread from Morrisons. Yes, the UK does produce the safest food in the world. Here, the rules are more sophisticated and better policed than anywhere else.

The whole of agricultural policy following two world wars, was food security and “food” was identified as farm crops as harvested. . While we forget that lesson at our peril, we now have to think in terms of Adding Value.  Doing that by taking a harvested crop (such as vegetables) and processing and packaging them is certainly a step in the right direction.  However, there is another way of looking at Adding Value and that is at an industry level for the national economy. One of the most important ways we can do that is to accept, co-operate with and seek to influence and re-direct regulation and regulators to deliver what is, and should be recognised as already the case, the safest food in the world.

Bill Butterworth, Land Research Ltd.,  26 April 2017

Click here for Survival

Ferguson and Conservation Agriculture

Ferguson was a revolution which will always be part of production on the land. However, there are opportunities to add new dimensions.

There is no doubt that Sir Harry Ferguson’s invention of the farm tractor 3-point linkage, which gave weight transfer off the cultivation tool down the top link onto the driving wheels of the tractor, revolutionised world farming and has saved many millions of the human race, including ourselves in the West, from starvation. There is no doubt that it is still relevant.

Nevertheless, we have moved on into an era where we need less damage to soil structure, less nutrient loss to ground water, less energy use, less pressure on climate change. And more food to feed a rocketing population.

Quite simply, we need to recycle urban waste to land and use zero till wherever feasible. To do this, another step in tractor development is now a marketing opportunity. Back in the1970’s, I published an article in the then journal “Big Farm Management” which predicted that the global tractor market would split into 5 roughly equal sectors; (i) mid-range, Ferguson design “maid of all work”, (i)  similar but small, up to 30 horse power, (iii) very large over 150 hp and moving to tracked, rather than wheeled, (iv) MHT’s – materials handling tractors, mainly telescopic loaders, and (v) HST’s – High Speed Transport tractors; lighter-weight, transport tractors equipped with PTO and capable of field work.

That prophesy has turned out as predicted for the first 4 categories.  Now, the need to move to conservation agriculture and zero-till, makes the move to this last category of lighter weight, transport-capable, versatile tractors,  over-due and a real opportunity for the tractor trade to supply emerging trends on conservation coupled to more efficient production.

Land Research Ltd, 14 April 2017

Survival, Water & Farming

Farming, food production and water are not only global issues, they are already significant in the UK’s green and pleasant land.

I took this picture earlier this evening, on the top of chalk downs near Devizes in Wiltshire. What happened to April showers? The spring-sown crops are struggling.  Whatever Donald Trump says, the climate is changing and there are visible consequences.

Read about these issues. Put “Survival Bill Butterworth Amazon” into your search engine or try Kindle instead of Amazon.  The book is free to download for the next 4 Sundays – 16, 23, 30 April and & May.and not much to buy anytime.  The paperback version is OK to read but if you download, it is better on a big screen because of some of the tables and diagrams.

Land Research Ltd, 13 April 2017

3 Million Starving;Food, Famine and Failure

Municipal waste on its way to Frog Island on the Thames estuary There is enough waste in western society, to fertilise enough crop,s to feed western society,

The UN warning of 3 million people facing what will for most of them be unavoidable starvation and death is not new.  Malthus predicted it in 1798 and we have been doing a bit since then but not enough. If you are comfortable, why do anything at all about it?  In any case, as an individual, what you do is insignificant.

An international consequence is that empty bellies always lead to war.  In the history of the world, that has always been true.  Could we fill bellies globally?  Technically, the answer is yes, we can.  Military conflict often gets in the way.  Political will in developed countries always gets in the way.  It is almost a lifetime away that Bob Geldoff stood up in the EU Parliament and observed that the situation of global hunger and the plenty of Western counties was “obscene”.  It is now worse.

How do we fix it?  Simply use urban wastes to fertilise land and grow better crops.  It has been done in the UK and Egypt, and lots of other places. We need to scale it up and urgently. It would save a lot of imports in the UK, too, The environment would be better off, See “Survival”.

Land Research Ltd 25 MaRCH 2017

Nitrogen and the Environment

Shredded waste carpet, containing wool (as an organic nitrogen source). If the carpet contains synthetic fibers, too, then so much the better for soil structure and holding water (so reducing irrigation need and reducing flood risk lower down in the catchment).

Nitrogen and the environment is in the news again.  The truth is that we can have more than enough Nitrogen to grow even higher yielding crops, provided it is organically bound. That means that farming either has to find organic sources of N (not always available and likely to be expensive), or make them.  The way to make them is potentially both safe and profitable.

The one great blessing of the expanding numbers and wealth of the human race is that that expansion is mirrored by an increase in urban and industrial wastes. Most of that waste can, despite the reticence of the regulators, be safely recycled to land.  To do so not only solves the waste recycling problem, it can and will grow better crops with higher yield, with less cultivation energy, less crop disease, and dramatically less Nitrogen run-off.

How do we know that?  Because it has been done. Search; How to make on-farm composting work

Land Research Ltd  13 March 17

Soil Organic Matter

Moore Unidrill

The Moore Unidrill’s patents related to keeping the seed sown at the same depth regardless of how much seed is in the grain tank. This direst drill gives an unparalleled even establishment.,

Farmers can get paid to make their own organic fertilisers from urban wastes by composting.  Is it easy and without hassle? Certainly not but it does produce better crops, with lower cultivation costs and higher yields. There is a part way stage and that is to conserve as much organic matter as possible in the soil, including leaving crop residues and minimising cultivations.  In most crops, approaching half the total dry matter of the plant will be below the surface of the soil. Cultivation oxidises organic matter.  Conventional ploughing and power harrowing plus seeding can destroy up to 35 % of soil organic matter per annum.  Direct drilling as little as 10 %. .

For more detail of preserving organic matter and profits, put “Survival by Bill Butterworth Amazon” into your search engine to download details.

Land Research Ltd September 2016

Fertilisers, farming and urban wastes

Manitou compost

Fertiliser costs will be increasingly crippling if we continue to use manufactured ones. Urban wastes are a valuable source of NPK. WE HAVE to develop this route if our children are to survive.

I really have problems with the word “waste”, especially if Brussels and Whitehall (in their great wisdom) wish to label them “Controlled Wastes” and lay down a set of rules. Millions of words and man-hours are spent creating prescriptive regulations – meaning “in this case you do that, in that case, you do this”.  Such an approach can never cover all eventualities and it stifles responsibility on the ground and inhibits economic growth.  There is only one rule that matters – do not pollute or damage the life around you.

How do we achieve that?  By using a technical understanding to identify and manage risks.  By the way, the biggest risk is to do nothing.  We live in a changing world and the tension between production and the environment in which we life is ever-increasing as population increases.  Some of the answers are in Survival!  (Click on the underlined word.)

Bill Butterworth, Land Research Ltd 6 July 2016