Tag Archives: Population growth

Brexit sadness

I have to admit that while my original objections (corruption at the centre and the weight of prescriptive regulations) were valid and still stand, my hope was that everyone would get pulled up to think about it and find another solution.  There was then, and is so now, as far as I can see, a choice between two options.  Firstly, Brexit.  Everyone here is ashamed of the UK government’s shambolic infighting. Similarly at fault is the centre of the EU itself.  This idea of “make it difficult for the UK because we don’t want anyone else to leave” seriously implies that Brussels realises that there is something wrong and instead of getting everyone (ALL EU Members) round a table and see if  a better way forward can be found, they sit and complain that it is all the UK’s fault.As far as I can see, there is little hope of Brussels exercising some common sense, taking the initiative and inviting the UK to discuss with all the Members how we can all produce a better EU framework. If we, all the EU, do not do that, the entire world order will be different with a less safe global environment and weakened western-economies.  this is a really sad situation.

Bill Butteworth, Land Research, 13 July 18

 

 

I share your sadness.

The NHS is a national gem

This is the exact spot where two Novichok sufferers entered what is certainly the best place in the world to go under those circumstances.

It is time to accept that we cannot go on with the NHS the way we are doing.  The key, fundamental, world-best feature is “free at the point of need” with no-one denied service when the need it. That is a staggering commitment. Unfortunately, with a net population increase of 500,000 people  in the UK every year and an aging population (because the NHS is so good), we cannot afford what we are trying to do.  We need to have a public discussion about what the NHS should do and which treatments is should not be doing.  Perhaps the most tricky possibility is to find a way of the NHS working with patients who might wish to pay for a bit extra without either short-changing those who do not pay a bit extra, nor privatising the organisation by the back door,  Do I think it is possible?  Well, I am hoping so because I have been humbled recently by being appointed a Governor of the Salisbury NHS Hospital.  To be part of the discussion is a privilege and one that all of us should be part of.  Each of us has an obligation, partly for selfish reasons, to write to our own MP and tell them all what we think the NHS should do and what it should not do.  Aall of that without losing the competence, care and compassion of which the nation is justly proud.

Bill Butterworth, Land Research Ltd 19 June 18

“From our Own Resources”

We are loosing land, thousands of acres every year. We produce the safest arable products in the world.

We are losing dairy herds at a dramatic rate and importing milk. Less safe milk!

I hear the talk about “environment” and “countryside” on one side, on the other I hear talk of “productivity”.  Farming remains Britain’s biggest industry and farm production remains a fundamental component of the national economy.  If, for the sake of political correctness, the Environment Secretary ignores, or otherwise takes the emphasis off farm production, he does so at the peril of the national economy.  Where is common sense?  Where is the national vision?  Some will remember a White Paper from Peter Walker, Minister of Agriculture; “From our Own Resources”. What on earth has gone wrong with this nation?  Where is the vision of production and growth? Where is the statesman who can drive production up so that we can afford the NHS?  Without productivity, we are nothing.

Bill Butterworth, Land Research Ltd,  April 18

The Land, population and policy

Once we have built on land, it can never again be farmed to produce food.

As I drive around the country, the rash of “toy town” building estates continues to eat up farmland much as the red blotches of measles cover a child’s body.  Apparently, the “build more houses” policy will solve all the country’s economic problems. I remember Stephen Nortcliff saying at a meeting of the BSSS (British Society of Soil Science)  “when land is built on, we can never have it back for farming.”

In round figures, there was a net immigration into the UK last year of over 500,000 and we built a little over 100,000 houses. On top of that there appears to be a growing policy as part of Brexit that we trade exports of manufactured goods and services for imports of food and turn the countryside into a play area for urban people.  We do this as a short term politically correct expedient and our long term peril.  Write to your MP about it.

Bill Butterworth, Land Research Ltd  22 April 18

 

 

 

I can’t be bothered

On 20th February, BBC 1, Points West, reported on Prince Charles visiting the British Army Rapid Reaction Force in which around half the members are soldiers and other service personnel from other countries.  The visitors were about to go home and several were asked what they would miss about Britain.  Several answered with quips such as “the British weather”.  A lady soldier with good english and good humour said, “I will really miss hearing people say “I can’t be bothered”.  We do not have an equivalent expression in Germany”.

Bill Butterworth, Land Research Ltd, 21 February 18

Vision of UK Farming

THIS

For half a century, the British government and (latterly) the EU have supported production.

OR THIS

Of late, the UK Environment Secretary has begun to signal a further shift in financial support towards a politically correct view of “the environment”.

We actually produce more per ha than any other country on earth.  We produce the most policed and safest food compared with every other country on earth.

So where will UK farming be in 10 years’ time?  By current political correctness, no doubt with awfully nice, “fluffy” environmental “improvements”.

We certainly do need to work very hard at environmental safety and care.  We certainly need to protect and encourage wild life.  However, stifling farm production will do little help on these matters.  If we really want to help “the environment”, whatever you understand by that, then we need to stop people breeding.  It is not about race, it is about numbers. Common sense tells us that uncontrolled population growth, globally and in the UK, by whatever route, must eventually destroy everything we value. But, then, common sense ain’t common any more.  For a larger, researched and balanced review of population growth and food production, see https://www.amazon.co.uk/Survival-Sustainable-Energy-Wastes-Shale/dp/1523264217

Bill Butterworth, Land Research Ltd 19 February 2018

We actually produce more per ha than any other country on earth.  We produce the most policed and safest food compared with every other country on earth.

So where will UK farming be in 10 years’ time?  By current political correctness, no doubt with awfully nice, “fluffy” environmental “improvements”.

We certainly do need to work very hard at environmental safety and care.  We certainly need to protect and encourage wild life.  However, stifling farm production will do little help on these matters.  If we really want to help “the environment”, whatever you understand by that, then we need to stop people breeding.  It is not about race, it is about numbers. Common sense tells us that uncontrolled population growth, globally and in the UK, by whatever route, must eventually destroy everything we value. But, then, common sense ain’t common any more.  For a larger, researched and balanced review of population growth and food production, see https://www.amazon.co.uk/Survival-Sustainable-Energy-Wastes-Shale/dp/1523264217

Bill Butterworth, Land Reseaarch Ltd 19 February 2018

Yes! We can

I have previously published in this blog, a graph of population growth and the likely collapse following too much growth and an airborne, multi-virus pandemic.  It is pretty depressing, not because of the collapse itself but because it is avoidable. Firstly, we have to stop people breeding. It defies common sense to allow continued growth.  So far, the claimed logic of decreasing birth rates as wealth increases is more than counter-balanced by medical advance reducing death rates. Secondly, we do need to up our game in food production.  We can increase food production and food security.  We can produce food safely.  We can use urban waste to reclaim the deserts.  We can use composted urban wastes to reduce irrigation need.

We can reduce birth rates and increase food production.  Why don’t we push a bit harder?  Right now!

Bill Butterworth, Land Research Ltd, 23 January 2018