Farming, Employed labour and political power.

Not to vote really should be a punishable offence. However, what will the elected politicians do for farming?

 

The more cynical might notice that, during the run up to an election, a large number of organisations and individuals become suddenly vocal in putting their case and asking for cash, pointing out that such additions would earn votes. Those wishing to be elected make promises which those with any intelligence take with a very small pinch of salt and then vote, not for their approved candidate but against those they like least.

For over 200 years, farming has become more and more efficient, employing less and less labour and has become a smaller and smaller proportion of the voting electorate.

The truth is that farming needs to forget the politicians (all of them) which will forget farming and, instead, get on with cutting costs (recycle wastes instead of buying mineral fertilisers), growing higher value crops and adding value to their production.  However, that is still not enough, farming has to market itself and its products better.  Much better and much more actively. Doing all of this will employ more labour which will, in due course, make it politically more influential.

Bill Butterworth, Land Research Ltd, 31 May 17