The beginning of the end

It is not impossible to turn global warming upside down.

 

The New Scientist this week comments on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report that we have 12 years to save the planet. Interestingly, while pointing out that the evidence is overwhelming that the rise in global warming is human-made and really dangerous and already producing problems, they also argue that the evidence is that we can do something about it.

What this blog is sometimes about is that composting urban waste globally could make a real contribution to limiting and even reversing by locking up Carbon in organic matter and by reducing and eliminating the manufacture of Nitrogen fertilisers (which, according to UN-sponsored research takes 21,000 kWh to make one tonne of N nutrient – and that is in a modern and efficient USA factory).

Bill Butterworth, Land Research Ltd, 16 October 18

fracking-Cuadrilla-earth quakes

If you are reading this, yopu are using energy which has been provided, in th emain, by burning fossilised fuels. Ask yourself, does it make sense to use our shale gas or impost oil and gas from half way round the world and export the cash and jobs?

 

Anyone who says that hydraulic fracturing is without risks is quite certainly wrong.  Similarly, anyone who says that banning fracturing in the UK has less risk is quite certainly wrong.

What can be said is that in the UK, shale gas rocks are around twice as deep as is the case generally in the USA and the rocks are harder.  We also have dramatically better technology and policing by the Environment Agency.

Currently, we ship shale gas from the USA and Middle East in specially constructed ships.  If you heat your home with gas, ask yourself if it make environmental sense to ship gas half way round the world, from places that really do use much less safe production than we will do, and export the jobs.

For a short piece on earthquakes near Blackpool, search https://landresearch.wordpress.com/wp-admin/post.php?post=991&action=edit

Bill Butterworth, Land Research Ltd, 15 Oct 18

National Debt bigger than education Budget!

The national debt (what successive government have borrowed to buy our votes) is now £1.8 trillion.  The interest, we heard on the BBC News this evening (4th Oct 18) is greater than the entire education budget. That is insane. The people we borrow off (Chinese, Arab countries, etc) ) will not kill us off completely, they will almost do that but not quite, just milk us forever.  That is the nature of debt. We need to balance the books.  The only thing big enough is shale gas. Stop importing energy when we are sitting on a vast reservoir.  by the way, we can do it safely.

Bill Butterworth, Land Research Ltd, 4 October 18

Winds will get stronger

We know that burning aviation fuel advances global warming by producing GHG (Green House Gas), BUT, it also delivers what is called “global dimming” because the ice crystals which allow us to see jet contrails also reflect sun radiation back into space. Complexity yields uncertainty.

The global weather system is complex and how it will change with respect to the global warming that we all (except, apparently, Mr Trump) know is happening is difficult to predict in detail and fast enough. One of the problems with that is that by the time we are sure of something, it may be too late to do much about it. The evidence so far does not suggest that climate change causes hurricanes. However, it’s becoming more and more clear that a warming climate leads to more devastating hurricanes.

As far as UK farming is concerned, the implication is that winds generally will get stronger and storm winds will do more damage to crops. Wind breaks and stronger cereal straw are still likely to be part of the defence strategy.  Wind turbines may be a better investment, too.

 

Bill Butterworth, Land Research Ltd, 3 October 18

Storms Are Moving Poleward

 

We can expect stronger storms and, therfefore, increased lodging risk.

According to the World Resource Institute, Scientists suspect that human-caused warming can help explain why the latitude of where tropical cyclones reach their peak intensity has moved 53 and 62 kilometers poleward per decade in the Northern and Southern hemispheres, respectively, away from the tropics. While there has yet to be any signal of migration of storm intensity in the Atlantic, this migration is occurring in other ocean basins, especially the Pacific and South Indian Oceans. Regions that are further away from the equator could see an increased risk of intense storms. On the other hand, those communities closer to the equator, which rely upon tropical cyclone rainfall as freshwater, could see threats to their water supplies.

Bill Butterworth, Land research Ltd, 29th Sept 18

The Soil Rumen and Ion Exchange

The soil is much as the cow’s rumen. It is not the cow that digests the food, it is the rumen micro-organisms. then the micro-organisms feed the cow.

Think of the soil much as a cow’s rumen. Click on the blue band above here on “articles” and go to no 16 and click.

or try https://landresearch.files.wordpress.com/2018/09/the-soil-rumen-and-ion-exchange1.pdf

High Speed Winds and Flooding

There wlll be more high speed winds and more flooding as global warming progresses. provision to help water get away is prudent.

Over the next 2 or 3 entries on this blog, I shall be reporting, courtesy of the World Resource Institute, on high speed winds.

Scientists have known for years that global warming can exacerbate storms. But our understanding of the connection between hurricanes and climate change has evolved significantly in just the past year. Here’s what the cutting-edge science shows.

If storms hover above an area of land for long periods of time, they continue to dump rain, amplifying the risk of flooding. Very recent research has established a connection between warmer temperatures and the slowing of hurricane movement. A recent study in Nature found that from 1949 to 2016, the speed of tropical cyclones declined by 10 percent globally; North Atlantic tropical cyclones slowed down 20 percent over land areas during the same period. This slowing is part of the reason Hurricane Harvey caused so much damage when it stalled over Texas last year.

So, keep the field drains and ditches in order and let the rain get away – we can expect more of it.

Bill Butterworth, Land Research Ltd, 22 Sept 18